The Collective Picture

Vintage Photography Redefined

admin On January - 31 - 2011

photomicrograph flea

The daily grind, those activities that plague us with monotony, we have all felt it weighing us down as we are taxed by the sameness of it all. The routines we so easily fall into, that modern life often necessities we fall into. The world functions on ordered scripts and prefixed agendas. We slot ourselves into this reality and eek out an existence within the cracks and crevices, with varying degrees of sacrifice to our personal happiness. But as we pass the same corner store like we do every morning, or flash an obligatory smile at the neighbor we always bump into we may be overlooking the uniqueness of the experience because we are too busy trying to overlook the sameness. This world and all of its parts are in constant flux, ever changing and moving in both the largest and smallest of ways.From the microscopic level where the atoms that make up the fabric of our reality to the expansion of our universe and the movement of our planet’s plates that our supposedly idle bodies rest on.

x-ray technician

If we are constantly changing then seeing the supposedly ‘same thing’ every morning isn’t possible, sure the similarities in the experience may be glaring but if we look close, microsopically close, I think we will all be more overwhelmed by the uniqueness of each moment and how shockingly fast our realities change. Thanks to the wonders of modern science we can now peer with morbid curiosity into the depths of a man’s chest and through a frogs body. We can gaze with omnipresent vision through the microsope into the very structures of a snowflake and a tiny flea. Revealing the intricate complexities of our existence, one that, moment to moment, is anything but static.

x-ray chest roosevelt shooting

Photo related to John F. Schrank’s attempted assassination of U.S. President Teddy Roosevelt in Oct. 1912. Library of Congress. hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.10871

1890 snowflake study Microscopic Monotonymedical

1890, snowflake study by Wilson A. Bentley. These photomicrograph images supported the belief that no two snowflakes were alike

sucking tube tongue blowfly

photomicrograph of the sucking tube on the tongue of a blowfly at 300x

photomicrograph insect wings

Photomicrograph of an insect’s wings

x-ray frog archive photo

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Categories: medical, science

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